RSS FeedFacebookSearch
Gary Younge
Archive
Curtains for ‘Rachel Corrie’
So much for freedom of speech, let alone thought.
Hard Times in the Big Easy
"Just as the Carthaginians hired mercenaries to do their fighting for them, we Americans bring in mercenaries to do our hard and humble work," wrote John Steinbeck in


A reveller wear beads and a badge for the Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club as he celebrates Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Photograph: Dan Chung
Business as usual - almost - as King of the Zulus keeps Mardi Gras alive
And so on Tuesday Ike and Cherlyn Wheeler will don their robes and parade down the streets of the Crescent City as King and Queen Zulu to keep a tradition alive. As the leaders of one of the many social clubs, known as Krewes, that organise Mardi Gras they will march ahead of the Ambassador, Province Prince, Mr Big Stuff, Big Shot, the Governor and the rest of Zululand's royal court. With a "lard can" for a crown and a "banana stalk" for a sceptre the King will promenade through the city centre, mocking the New Orleans white establishment. Behind him his court will throw beads, sweets, toys and trinkets to cheering crowds as they have done almost every year for close to a century.
Liberty? No thanks
On June 19 1865, two months after the end of the American civil war, Union General Gordon Granger rode into Galveston, Texas with 200 troops to find that some people had not heard the news that slavery had ended. The last 250,000 slaves in the country still worked under bondage, unaware that they were supposed to have been liberated until Granger set them right, and free, with General Order Number 3. The slaves didn't know which day it was, so they called it Juneteenth - an official state holiday in Texas and increasingly a national African-American holiday.
'We're stunt queens. We have to be'
"She has worn fur, so the innocent did not get hurt," says Ingrid Newkirk, Peta's founder and director, with a big smile. "It wasn't friendly fire."
Where someone's pocket change can feed another's family for a week
"On a bad week you can get nothing," explains Victor Singh, who left his village near Amritsar, in India, five years ago and has not had a full-time job since. "Winter time is always slow. In the summer you can sometimes work four days a week." If nothing comes by 9am, he says, he'll go home and come back the next day - every day until his luck changes.
New roots
Oprah is a Zulu. Never mind that she was born and raised in Mississippi and her great grandparents hailed from no further away than Georgia and North Carolina, Ms Winfrey, the queen of the televised confessional, is not just suggesting her lineage might stretch back thousands of years to a specific African tribe. She is asserting it as a definitive fact. "I always wondered what it would be like if it turned out I am a South African. I feel so at home here ... Do you know that I actually am one?" she told an audience of 3,200 in Johannesburg last year. "I went in search of my roots and had my DNA tested, and I am a Zulu."
The Right to Be Offended
In April 2003 Danish illustrator Christoffer Zieler submitted a series of unsolicited cartoons offering a lighthearted take on the resurrection of Christ to the Danish newspaper
The gullibility that led us into the last war could yet bring us a new conflict
Two and a half years later Powell referred to the episode as "a painful blot" on his record - a pack of lies and half truths that has led to an ever-increasing mound of corpses.
Does the right to freedom of speech justify printing the Danish cartoons?
The first thing to say about the contested cartoons published by a Danish paper last September is that some are, indeed, offensive. Jyllands-Posten took up the case of a Danish author who could find no one to illustrate a book about the prophet Muhammad. The paper, presenting this as a case of self-censorship, asked 12 illustrators for depictions of the prophet, and the one that has caused immense offence shows the prophet wearing a turban that conceals a fizzing bomb.
© Gary Younge. All Rights reserved, site built with tlc
Who Are We – And Should It Matter in the 21st Century?
book review
The more power an identity carries, the less likely its carrier is to be aware of it as an identity at all.
 follow on twitter
RT @britainelects: Westminster voting intention: LAB: 40% CON: 37% LDEM: 7% UKIP: 6% GRN: 3% via @PopulusPolls, 10 - 11 Dec
Twitter: help me out. What's the most readable, comprehensive, perceptive book you know on the second world war.
ICYMI "Diminished, but not defeated, she is an object of pathos undeserving of our pity. This is Ms Windrush we’re… https://t.co/QzE0gnDgKH
RT @MsJeanRhys: She began to argue there was something unreal about most English people. 'They touch life with gloves on.'
@duduschka Fair enough. But you wouldn’t be supporting us. You’d be supporting the law centres, think tanks and cam… https://t.co/EgDl3lXtiZ
RT @LawCentres: The force is strong with @garyyounge and his Twitter game. Do give him a tinkle and help bring down the #HostileEnvironment
RT @PeterBradshaw1: Call the Guardian Telethon now on 020-3353 4368. I’m here with @KathViner, @shattenstone, @garyyounge, @pollytoynbee an…
"Discovering these writers, new and old, who were hiding in plain sight has been a bit like coming across a new wo… https://t.co/VoFdfG7ETq
@thesailorsgirl @thesailorsgirl. I loved Black Mamba Boy. There'll be more parties. And in the (kind of) words of E… https://t.co/htjnMgIdjF
© Gary Younge. All Rights reserved, site built with tlc