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James Jackson
Jackson was arrested in 1951, along with 20 others, for teaching classes on violent revolution. This was regarded as an offence under the Smith Act, a statute put forward in 1940 by the anti-labour and anti-civil rights southern congressman Howard Smith, which made advocating the overthrow of the US government a crime. Jackson and five other defendants went into hiding for five years - "roaming the country like during the underground railroad," as his wife Esther told the New York Times - but in 1956 he surrendered, was convicted and jailed for two years.
Drama relates story of America's downwinders
So begins Mary Dickson's play, Exposed, , which has been playing at Salt Lake City's Plan B theatre, where it sold out within days.
All Clinton has to do is prove her femininity. And her hypermachismo
Herein lie the two key and contradictory challenges for Hillary Clinton in her bid for the White House. On the one hand, she must not just be a woman but perform femininity. The fact that she is female is part of her appeal - particularly to women. Young girls at her rallies wear badges saying "I can be president". In her stump speech, she often cites a 95-year-old woman who told her: "I was born before women could vote, and I'm gonna live long enough to see a woman in the White House." "And I told her, 'Amen! Amen!'" responds Clinton. Finding a way to leverage this support is central to her electoral strategy.
'We used to think there was a black community'
For all her many achievements over the past 37 years, Angela Davis remains, for many, a symbol frozen in time. The time was 1970. It marked the end of a tumultuous era of civil rights struggle that culminated in the assassination of two of black America's most renowned leaders - Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. A period of peaceful demonstrations for integration in the rural south had been followed by a spate of violent disturbances in the urban north. The focus had shifted from integration to black power; the influences from Gandhi and the Bible to Mao and Marxism. In 1967, Aretha Franklin called for "r-e-s-p-e-c-t"; by 1970, the anthem was Edwin Starr's War.
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No Place Like Home – A Black Briton’s Journey through the American South
book review
'The idea of retracing the route is a great one, urgent and necessary.'
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