For 50 years our political class avoided a genuine debate on immigration. Now it’s paying the price

‘The Tories brazenly stoke popular prejudice, while Labour cravenly submits to it (see Ed Miliband’s mug).’

“The Tories brazenly stoke popular prejudice, while Labour cravenly submits to it (see Ed Miliband’s mug).”
Photograph: Labour

During the 1964 election Harold Wilson spent a day campaigning in London marginals, addressing crowds from the back of a lorry. Invariably he would be harangued by bigots demanding the repatriation of nonwhite people. Wilson faced the hecklers down. “Whom should we send home? The nurses in our hospitals? The people who drive our buses. Where would our health service be without the black workers who keep it going?” According to the late Paul Foot: “These questions were greeted with great roars of approval from the crowd, and the hecklers were silenced.”

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Orlando shooting exposes so many of America’€™s faultlines

As relatives grieve and a nation mourns, America’s political class will pick through the wreckage of the heinous events in Orlando and try to frame the tragedy in a way that suits their agenda. Those who hoped a tragedy of this nature might be extracted from partisan politics will be sorely disappointed.

Related: ‘Everyone get out and keep running’: how the Orlando attack unfolded

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Muhammad Ali knew he had a job to do on this planet – inspire people

Muhammad Ali at a press conference in 1980

Muhammad Ali: ‘I am America. I am the part you won’t recognise. But get used to me.’
Photograph: Daily Mail/REX/Shutterstock

Barack Obama works in his office in 2004 beneath a photo of Muhammad Ali standing over Sonny Liston.

Barack Obama works in his office in 2004 beneath a photo of Muhammad Ali standing over Sonny Liston. Photograph: M Spencer Green/AP

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