RSS FeedFacebookSearch
Gary Younge
Archive


A woman joins the protests in Ferguson after the grand jury decision: ‘The inherent nature of the injustice was not systematic, but systemic.’ Photograph: Xinhua Landov / Barcroft Media
The law may have spoken but the Ferguson verdict is not justice
It is customary, when disturbances follow a verdict of the kind delivered by the Ferguson grand jury, for those in authority to buttress their appeals for calm with a higher calling: the rule of law. Without it there would be chaos; only through it can there be order. As President Barack Obama said on Monday: “We are a nation based on the rule of law so we need to accept that this was the special jury’s decision to make.”


‘Around half the country believes undocumented immigrants should have a pathway to citizenship, while another 15% believe they should be able to stay without becoming citizens.’ Photograph: Asanka Brendon Ratnayake/REX
Republicans have called him a dictator. So why can’t Obama get his own way?
A crowd of anti-immigration protesters in Oracle, Arizona, gathered in July to block a bus they’d heard was full of children from Central America who had crossed the border unaccompanied, and possibly illegally, and were supposed to be arriving at a local shelter. Seeing a school bus approaching, Adam Kwasman, a Republican state legislator, broke off from a rant about Lady Liberty to tweet: “Bus coming in. This is not compassion. This is the abrogation of the rule of law.” He then joined the mob of protesters. He later told a television reporter: “I was able to actually see some of the children in the bus – and the fear on their faces … This is not compassion.”
Republicans didn't win as big as you think they did in the US midterm elections — video
Republicans didn't win as big as you think they did. And Obama didn't lose
In the end, there was no Republican wave. Indeed, ideologically it was barely a ripple. Unlike 2010, with the Tea Party, or 2006, when the Democrats took over, there was no all-encompassing agenda or over-arching theme. The Republicans won the US midterms – there’s no denying that – but they didn’t win as big as it first seems.
© Gary Younge. All Rights reserved, site built with tlc
No Place Like Home – A Black Briton’s Journey through the American South
book review
'The idea of retracing the route is a great one, urgent and necessary.'
 follow on twitter
RT @warwickuni: 🎓🎓 A leading Chinese scientist, three significant theatre figures and a leading Guardian journalist and broadcaster, are ju…
This appears quite damning. I look forward to Andrew Norfolk's response. https://t.co/JhoFvFvMwF
RT @tomcopley: He sounds exactly like the “I was very, very drunk” bloke from the Fast Show here. Utterly incoherent https://t.co/oSORzf15lq
RT @DrFrancesRyan: Tonight, I’m up for the Orwell Prize for ‘exposing the Social Evil’ of disability cuts. This morning, I have my PIP as…
RT @HarriettSG: Today on A Good Read: Nicci Gerrard + @garyyounge argue (politely but firmly) about Barbadians in Brooklyn, witchcraft and…
RT @frafranzisca: . @marcominimum a @MarinaCafeN intervista @garyyounge giornalista del @guardian Si parla di Stati Uniti, armi, disuguagl…
RT @BorderIrish: Blaming the neighbours when you’re having a row in your own house is quite Brexity
RT @davies_will: @toadmeister @guardian I assume this is Toby Young the famous privacy campaigner, and not the one who wrote this https://t…
RT @bungatuffie: The cruelty is unrelenting: Windrush victim dies with no apology or compensation https://t.co/cAHsReWZe9
© Gary Younge. All Rights reserved, site built with tlc