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A woman joins the protests in Ferguson after the grand jury decision: ‘The inherent nature of the injustice was not systematic, but systemic.’ Photograph: Xinhua Landov / Barcroft Media
The law may have spoken but the Ferguson verdict is not justice
It is customary, when disturbances follow a verdict of the kind delivered by the Ferguson grand jury, for those in authority to buttress their appeals for calm with a higher calling: the rule of law. Without it there would be chaos; only through it can there be order. As President Barack Obama said on Monday: “We are a nation based on the rule of law so we need to accept that this was the special jury’s decision to make.”


‘Around half the country believes undocumented immigrants should have a pathway to citizenship, while another 15% believe they should be able to stay without becoming citizens.’ Photograph: Asanka Brendon Ratnayake/REX
Republicans have called him a dictator. So why can’t Obama get his own way?
A crowd of anti-immigration protesters in Oracle, Arizona, gathered in July to block a bus they’d heard was full of children from Central America who had crossed the border unaccompanied, and possibly illegally, and were supposed to be arriving at a local shelter. Seeing a school bus approaching, Adam Kwasman, a Republican state legislator, broke off from a rant about Lady Liberty to tweet: “Bus coming in. This is not compassion. This is the abrogation of the rule of law.” He then joined the mob of protesters. He later told a television reporter: “I was able to actually see some of the children in the bus – and the fear on their faces … This is not compassion.”
Republicans didn't win as big as you think they did in the US midterm elections — video
Republicans didn't win as big as you think they did. And Obama didn't lose
In the end, there was no Republican wave. Indeed, ideologically it was barely a ripple. Unlike 2010, with the Tea Party, or 2006, when the Democrats took over, there was no all-encompassing agenda or over-arching theme. The Republicans won the US midterms – there’s no denying that – but they didn’t win as big as it first seems.
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Stranger in a Strange Land – Encounters in the Disunited States
book review
'It often takes an outsider to look inside. This is especially true of the United States.'
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"The issue of Begum’s return, like the Windrush scandal, centres on the same two questions: what does it mean to be… https://t.co/C2IYVwB4sv
RT @ABBYGORDON: Great article by Gary Younge (My year of reading African women https://t.co/peoMaHnY0V) inspired me to do the same. So far…
"Shamima Begum was 15 when she did something stupid and repressible; @sajidjavid is 49. What's his excuse?" https://t.co/SNDeO2hSyY
RT @AGlasgowGirl: Sajid Javid eats daal with a knife and fork
RT @MsJeanRhys: She had another whisky and went on about being clever.
RT @ibne_khalid: @riffraff0001 @garyyounge Some have been prosecuted but most have been deemed low risk or pose no risk at all, per Sajid J…
"She is a citizen. That means something. Or at least it should. Citizenship is not about character. That’s as true… https://t.co/gmpWOlIz5T
RT @NaomiAKlein: NYC friends: can't wait to talk to Bill McKibben about his brilliant new book, Falter. It's been 30 years since he wrote t…
Far from making Javid look strong, it manages to make Britain look both callous and weak. A government that thinks… https://t.co/YLLJ4GP9d3
RT @GWorldComments: Shamima Begum has a right to British citizenship, whether you like it or not | Gary Younge https://t.co/rmHjIRC8B0
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