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‘There’s precious little that Obama’s done
that any of his primary opponents would not have done.’
Photograph: TJ Kirkpatrick/Corbis
What the hell is Barack Obama's presidency for?
A few days after John F Kennedy's assassination, Lyndon Johnson sat in his kitchen with his key advisers working his first speech to Congress. It was the evening of Kennedy's funeral – Johnson was now president. The nation was still in grief and Johnson, writes Robert Caro in The Years of Lyndon Johnson: The Passage of Power, was not yet able to move into the White House because Kennedy's effects were still there.
Jordan Davis (kelseu/Flickr)
Freelance Stop-and-Shoot
There is a moment in the film


Never finished … Stuart Hall. Photograph: Antonio Olmos
Stuart Hall: a class warrior and a class act
At a Race Matters conference in 1994 the great and good of black America's cognoscenti gathered at Princeton University to mark Cornel West's departure to Harvard. Among them were Nobel laureate Toni Morrison, the late Manning Marable, Patricia Williams and Angela Davis. When questions were invited following the opening panel the first speaker came to the mic. "Stuart Hall, the Open University," he said, by way of introduction. "The room exploded into applause," wrote Claire Alexander in a special edition of Cultural Studies in 2009. "It was the only time I have ever witnessed someone getting a standing ovation for simply saying their name."


Adverts at the Super Bowl are expected
Coca-Cola's Super Bowl ad showed that some Americans still can't take diversity
The Super Bowl is as much about the ads as it is about the game. Last week, for the fifth time in six years, the American football final broke the record for the most watched television event in the nation's history. That's serious marketing real estate, with the average 30-second spot costing around $4m (£2.4m). At this price companies expect not just an ad but an artefact – the kind of cultural product that not only shifts units but touches the zeitgeist.
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